Pinsa Vs Pizza

Pinsa Vs Pizza — What’s The Difference?

The pizza dough might be familiar to you, but there’s another type of dough that’s been making a comeback recently – and it’s nearly 2,000 years old!

Can you tell me what the difference is between pinsa and pizza? A pinsa is made from wheat flour, soy flour, rice flour, and spelt flour. While regular pizza dough is usually made with all-purpose flour, yeast, sugar, and salt, there is much more to it than that.

Get to know pinsa, its toppings, taste, texture, and how it differs from pizza!

What Came First — Pinsa Or Pizza?

It is believed that pizza has been around since early civilization in some form or another. There have been many iterations of this delicious dish.

Pinsa, for instance, has been a part of the human diet since the first century!

It’s true, pinsa existed before pizza, but it wasn’t consumed the same way.

Humans began to incorporate grain flour into their diet to combat the scarcity of resources, and this is partly what led to pinsa’s invention.

In its dough, Pinsa uses a combination of wheat, spelt, soy, and rice flours, giving it its signature crispness and flavor.

Scarcity is the reason pinsa requires so many types of flour.

Since there wasn’t much food available to feed large groups of people or families, early civilizations used whatever was available to make dense, nutritious food – and the humble pinsa was among them.

Characteristics Of Pinsa

Pinsa has a number of noteworthy characteristics!

Flavor

Pinsa is characterized by a very earthy and grainy flavor due to its multi-grain composition. It can give quite a lot of maturing flavor notes, especially when compared to regular pizza dough.

As the dough is made with spelt flour, it has a slightly tangy and nutty flavor, while the soy and rice flours give the dough a balanced earthy flavor.

Because pinsa dough has a distinct flavor, pizzas made from this type of bread have a much stronger flavor profile.

Most people can enjoy this bread with just a simple drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, just like focaccia bread!

It doesn’t matter what kind of cheese or topping you use, pinsa provides an extremely balanced canvas for a wide range of flavors.

Therefore, the ingredients will work together and provide a more cohesive flavor than if you used regular pizza dough.

Texture

Compared to other doughs, pinsa is crispy, tender, chewy, and overall delicious.

There are various types of flour used in pinsa, each of which plays a key role in the texture of the product.

In addition to adding mass and chewy texture to the bread, the wheat flour also adds crispiness as it bakes.

Both soy flour and spelt flour provide structure and chewiness and deliver a better mouthfeel than regular pizza dough.

Depending on how it is baked and prepared, pinsa can also provide a variety of textural characteristics.

Those who bake pinsa for longer will get a deeper caramelized texture with a crisp outside and a light fluffy interior, while those who bake them for shorter will have a more tender and chewy texture.

The traditional flatbread texture of pinsa can also be achieved without yeast.

The dough will have a much crispier exterior and a very lightly chewy texture. Typically, unleavened pinsas are used for pizza.

Since pinsa contains multiple types of flour, it is naturally able to absorb slightly more water than regular pizza dough.

Uses

Cheese or a great-tasting wine goes well with pinsa.

This type of bread is making a comeback in the form of pizza, but it can be enjoyed in the same way as focaccia.

Traditionally, pinsa is used as pizza dough, and it is usually shaped like an oblong. Pinsa is derived from the Latin word “Pinsere,” meaning “to spread out” or “to stretch.”

Pizza makers can easily use toppings in this leaf-shaped shape, and since the dough is soft and extremely pliable, you can also depress the surface with various objects to add textures.

You can make square indents over the surface of the bread using chopsticks, which when baked will produce small pockets of crispy, chewy bread!

Differences From Pizza

There are a few characteristics that differentiate pinsa from pizza which may seem similar (and sound similar).

Here’s how regular pizza dough compares to pinsa!

Flavor

Apart from adding sugar, pizza dough is largely bland, so pizzerias use various ingredients to give it flavor. The dough is always leavened and made with only all-purpose flour.

There are a wide variety of savory flavors that can be added to dough by adding products such as sugar, milk, and herbs.

Pizza dough usually has a plain flavor with just a little flavor from the crust, especially when it has a light egg wash.

The dough used by mainstream pizzerias is slightly sweeter and savory, making it a perfect match for almost any savory topping.

Unlike bread improvers, stabilizers, and enhancers, pinsa does not require an elaborate list of ingredients, other than the required types of flour.

While pinsa can be prepared without yeast, when used for pizza, the dough usually contains yeast to leaven it lightly.

Rather than offering a complex flavor, this type of dough offers an earthy and grainy flavor that works well with a variety of flavorful toppings.

Texture

The mouthfeel and subtle variations of Pinsa make it one of the most sought after wines!

Pinsa resembles flatbread in terms of texture (even when yeast is added) because it has an uneven surface after baking.

Despite poking holes in the dough to remove these air pockets, the inherent structure of the dough will still permit bubbles to form around the corners.

Besides having a much pronounced exterior, pinsa also has a very doughy, chewy interior with a noticeable crispiness around the edge. 

The process of making regular pizza dough is much simpler.

A typical pizza dough has a doughy exterior and a lightly crispy exterior, but the inside is almost always chewy and tender. The overall texture depends on the way the dough is baked. 

The outside of most hand-tossed doughs is crisper and more chewy, while the outside of a Chicago-style deep-dish pizza is much chewier and doughy!

Uses

The main difference between pinsa and regular pizza dough is that pinsa can be used along with regular bread.

Contrary to this, pizza dough is never enjoyed without toppings and always needs some form of topping or condiment to enhance its flavor.

A pinsa dough also takes much longer to proof than regular pizza dough, which takes only a few hours to a day to proof.

The simplest way to enjoy pinsa is with a glass of fine wine or an olive or nut oil drizzle. You can even pair pinsa with cheese of any kind.

You can, however, prepare pinsa just like any other pizza if you wish to keep it up to date with how it is currently used.

The Pinsa pizza dough is somewhere between a Neapolitan pizza and a regular pizza dough.

Pinsa Vs Pizza — Comparison Chart

Let’s take a closer look at pinsa and how it compares to pizza in a chart:

How To Make Classic Pinsa

You can make classic pinsa dough with this recipe. It will also show how this dough differs from regular pizza dough and even most flatbreads.

Ingredients

  • 2 324 cups wheat flour (type 405 or 550)

  • Spelt flour, 25 cups 

  • Rice flour, 12 cups 

  • Soy flour, 14 cups 

  • Fresh yeast, 16 teaspoons

  • Water, 1 14 cups

  • Salt 1 teaspoon

  • Olive oil, 1 tablespoon

Instructions

  1. It is recommended to let the pinsa sit for 2–3 days before baking it for a delicious result. 

  2. Combine all the flours in a bowl and mix well.

  3. Add the yeast to the flour mixture separately and dissolve it in cold water. The cold water will activate the yeast and also aid in the development of gluten.

  4. Add the salt to the flour and knead with your hands for about 2–3 minutes. Gently fold the yeast water into the flour and keep mixing until a dough forms.

  5. You can also add a splash of water to make the dough more pliable and soft, just as you would for pizza dough.

    • In spite of the fact that pinsa dough can take on more water, we recommend that you don’t go overboard or the dough will lose its elasticity and general structure.

  6. By hand or with a dough mixer, knead the dough for 20–25 minutes.

  7. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes under a kitchen towel.

    • The kneading time during the resting period should be set to 3–5 mixes every 10 minutes if you are using a mixer.

    • The dough should be lightly kneaded for 1–2 minutes after every 10 minutes if you are kneading it by hand.

  8. After the dough has been kneaded and rested for 48 hours, line the inside of a large container with olive oil and place the dough into the container. Put the container in the fridge at 40°F for 48 hours.

    • Ensure that the container is twice as large as the dough! The dough may double or triple in size, so the top of the container should remain slightly ajar so it can expand.

  9. When the dough has rested in the fridge for 2–3 days, it’s time to bake! 

  10. Using flour over a clean working surface, flip the container to release the dough. This step should be easy if the container was properly lubricated.

  11. Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for about 2–3 hours after scraping off the remaining dough (if necessary).

  12. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces by gently folding it into itself once. Use a knife to cut the dough into 4 equal pieces.

  13. It doesn’t matter if the shape is more oval or rectangular; just stretch each piece into an oblong shape.

  14. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit while you rest the final shaped dough for about an hour.

  15. Make plain pinsa bread and enjoy it on its own or with sides, or prepare a simple pizza by topping the dough with some pizza sauce, herbs, and mozzarella.

  16. Try using a pizza peel! Gently yank the dough onto the peel and adjust its shape one last time if necessary.

  17. From the peel, take the dough to the oven and bake it for 10–12 minutes, or until the dough is golden brown and the toppings are crisp.

    • For pinsa, we recommend using a pizza stone, which will give the dough its distinctive crust. Preheat it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

  18. After the pinsa has reached the desired doneness, remove from the oven and let the pinsa rest for 2–3 minutes before cutting.

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Pinsa Homemade

Preparation time: three days

Cooking time: 12 minutes

Time taken: 3 DAYS 12 MINUTES

This recipe will teach you how to make classic pinsa dough as well as how it differs from regular pizza dough and most flatbreads.

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Ingredients

  • 2 324 cups wheat flour (type 405 or 550)

  • The following recipe calls for 25 cups of whole meal spelt flour

  • The following amount of rice flour is 12 cups

  • Soy flour, 14 cups

  • Fresh yeast, 16 tablespoons

  • Water, 1 1/4 cups

  • Salt to taste, 1 teaspoon

  • Olive oil 1 tsp

Instructions

  1. It is recommended to let the pinsa sit for 2–3 days before baking it for a delicious result. 

  2. Add all the flours to a bowl and stir well.

  3. When the yeast is dissolved in cold water, add it to the flour mixture. The cold water will activate the yeast, enabling gluten to develop.

  4. After mixing the yeast water into the flour, gently fold in the salt, and knead for 2–3 minutes with your hands.

  5. You can also add a splash of water to make the dough more pliable and soft, just as you would for pizza dough.

  6. You may add more water to pinsa, but don’t go overboard, otherwise the dough may lose its elasticity.

  7. Dough should be kneaded for 20–25 minutes by hand or by using a dough mixer.

  8. We recommend covering the dough with a kitchen towel for 30 minutes and kneading it 3–5 times every 10 minutes during the resting period on a mixing machine. If you are kneading the dough by hand, then lightly knead it after every 10 minutes for 1–2 minutes.

  9. As soon as the dough is kneaded and rested, line the inside of a large container with olive oil, lift it carefully, and place it in the container. Refrigerate the container for 48 hours at 40°F. The container must be at least twice the size of the dough! It is possible that the dough will double or triple in size, so leave the top of the container ajar so that it can push through if it expands.

  10. When the dough has rested in the fridge for 2–3 days, it’s time to bake! 

  11. As described in Step 8, dust some flour over a clean work surface and then carefully flip the container to release the dough.

  12. If necessary, scrape off the remaining dough and let it rest at room temperature for about two to three hours.

  13. Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces by gently folding it into itself once. Use a knife to cut the dough into 4 equal pieces.

  14. It doesn’t matter if the shape is more oval or rectangular; just stretch each piece into an oblong shape.

  15. Pre-heat the oven to 450°F while waiting for the dough to rest for about an hour before baking.

  16. Make plain pinsa bread and enjoy it on its own or with sides, or prepare a simple pizza by topping the dough with some pizza sauce, herbs, and mozzarella.

  17. Try using a pizza peel! Gently yank the dough onto the peel and adjust its shape one last time if necessary.

  18. Bake the dough (over a pizza stone or on a lined baking sheet) for 10–12 minutes, or until golden brown.

  19. The pinsa dough will have its characteristic crust if you use a pizza stone. Preheat it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

  20. After the pinsa has reached the desired doneness, remove from the oven and let the pinsa rest for 2–3 minutes before cutting.

Theodore Jaron

Related Questions

There are many people touting Pinsa as the new best thing in the world of pizza and it has made a comeback in the mainstream market.

After learning all about pinsa and how it differs from regular pizza, let’s take a look at some related questions.

How long can you store pinsa in the fridge?

In order for the dough to become airy and soft over time, you have to let it prove for about two to three days in the fridge.

This dough can be stored in the fridge at 40°F for a maximum of 120 hours (5 days). However, we recommend checking the dough for signs of spoilage before consuming it.

Is pinsa healthier than pizza dough?

Because pinsa dough provides a combination of healthy grains and is usually paired with simple yet flavorful ingredients, it can be a more nutritious option than regular pizza.

Despite the fact that pinsa also contains gluten, the method of preparation and fiber content of pinsa allow the dough to be more digestible.

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