Dragon Sauce

Dragon Sauce

The flavor of this unique spicy sauce enhances the flavor of many dishes. It can be used as a marinade for meat, poultry, seafood, and rice.

In addition to elevating your dishes, dragon sauce is a must-have condiment in your kitchen.

While it is not as spicy as Sriracha, you can add chili sauce or chili powder to make it hotter if you wish.

Is This A Thick Sauce?

Neither too thick nor too thin, just right in the middle. Cornstarch thickens it just enough so it doesn’t completely ooze down your rice or veggies.

The sauce can be thinned by removing the cornstarch and simmering it without it.

Add the starch since it will coat anything you use it with nicely. It will make a great glaze for your next pork roast or spiced chicken wings.

Do I Need Vinegar In My Sauce?

A trinity of hot sauce ingredients would be chili peppers, vinegar, and salt. Dragon sauce contains these ingredients too, but instead of classic chili peppers, I have used hot chili sauce.

Vinegar is a very important part of the sauce, and you can’t just choose any kind.

The vinegar is in the sauce for two reasons:

  • In order to preserve it

  • Enhance the tangy flavor

When it comes to hot sauce flavor, vinegar adds an unmistakable sour, tangy, and lip-smacking quality. For many, that flavor is crucial.

You can also add different flavors to a sauce by using different vinegars. Knowing how to use them will give a recipe an incredible depth.

Choosing The Right Vinegar

You can choose from a variety of vinegars.

White Vinegar

The most common vinegar in hot sauce is white vinegar, which is made from grain alcohol and has the most neutral taste.

Despite its neutral flavor, white vinegar is still sharp and forward. You can think of it as a blank canvas that lets other flavors shine through.

Apple Cider Vinegar

It is derived from apple cider, so it has a sweeter, fruitier taste. It also has an incredibly distinct flavor, while still being softer than white vinegar.

White Wine Vinegar

Compared to white vinegar, this vinegar is sweeter and has a more mellow taste. It is tart but does not have the same bite as white vinegar. It is just the right balance of sweet and sour.

Rice Wine Vinegar

Due to its mildness, rice vinegar is best paired with cider vinegar, or white wine vinegar when making sushi rice.

Red Wine Vinegar

Some hot sauces benefit from this type of vinegar, which is less common than other vinegars.

A lot of people prefer this vinegar because of its distinctive, fruity flavor. I personally enjoy it in sauces with smoky flavors.

With the exception of red wine vinegar, you can use almost any of the vinegars listed here. I leave it for other sauces.

Coconut Aminos Vs. Soy Sauce

A salty, savory seasoning sauce made from coconut sap and sea salt, coconut aminos is similar in color and consistency to light soy sauce.

Compared to traditional soy sauce, coconut aminos are milder, sweeter, and contain less sodium.

In addition to being gluten-free, coconut aminos can also be consumed by those following low-carb or ketogenic diets.

Should I Toast The Sesame Seeds?

As sesame seeds are raw, they have a mild flavor, which can be used as is. However, if you prefer a deeper flavor, you can toast them.

Additionally, they will add a bit of crunch and a delicious nutty flavor. To toast sesame seeds, use a skillet or baking sheet over a stovetop.

Dragon Sauce

Time required for preparation: 5 minutes

5 minutes for cooking

6 servings

Ingredients

  • Sesame oil 1 tsp

  • Ginger minced to 1 tbsp

  • Minced 1 clove of garlic

  • Stock made from 34 cups of chicken

  • Vinegar of raw apple cider 14 cups

  • Honey, 3 tablespoons

  • To make a mild version, use tomato sauce instead of hot sauce

  • Soy sauce, 1 tablespoon

  • To taste, salt and pepper

  • Water 1 tbsp

  • Cornstarch, 1 tablespoon

  • As desired, sesame seeds

Instructions

In a sauce pot or deeper skillet, heat sesame seed oil.

Once the ginger and garlic are fragrant, add them to the pan.

Add chicken stock, vinegar, honey, hot sauce, soy sauce, salt, and pepper.

Stir the sauce until it simmers.

In the meantime, make a slurry of cornstarch and water.

Cook the sauce until thickened by adding the slurry.

Serve with sesame seeds after removing the sauce from the heat.

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Dragon Sauce

This recipe yields 6 servings

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cooking time: 5 minutes

Time: 10 minutes

You can use this spicy, tangy dragon sauce on noodle dishes, stir fry, egg rolls, and so much more!

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Ingredients

  • Sesame oil 1 tsp

  • Ginger minced to 1 tbsp

  • Minced 1 clove of garlic

  • Stock made from 34 cups of chicken

  • Vinegar of raw apple cider 14 cups

  • Honey, 3 tablespoons

  • To make a mild version, use tomato sauce instead of hot sauce

  • Soy sauce, 1 tablespoon

  • To taste, salt and pepper

  • Water 1 tbsp

  • Cornstarch, 1 tablespoon

  • As desired, sesame seeds

Instructions

    1. In a sauce pot or deeper skillet, heat sesame seed oil.

    2. Cook ginger and garlic until fragrant.

    3. Then add chicken stock, vinegar, honey, hot sauce or tomato sauce, soy sauce, salt, and pepper.

    4. Simmer the sauce.

    5. During this time, whisk the cornstarch with the water to make a slurry.

    6. Cook the sauce until thickened with the slurry.

    7. Once the sauce has been removed from the heat, sprinkle it with sesame seeds and serve.

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